Sonnet 130 my mistress eyes. Shakespeare Sonnet 130 2019-01-20

Sonnet 130 my mistress eyes Rating: 5,7/10 1195 reviews

Analysis of Sonnet 130 by William Shakespeare

sonnet 130 my mistress eyes

There have been a number of attempts to identify the Dark Lady, however none have some to fruition. However, what is common for both sonnets is the love that the poet feels for the woman. Shakespeare compares his mistress eyes that are nothing like the natural image of the sun. Throughout the medieval courtly love tradition, red and white are used to symbolize valiant knights and honorable ladies. I love to hear her speak, yet well I know That music hath a far more pleasing sound; I grant I never saw a goddess go; My mistress when she walks treads on the ground. I love to hear her speak, yet well I know That music hath a far more pleasing sound: I grant I never saw a goddess go,— My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground: And yet by heaven, I think my love as rare, As any she belied with false compare. In writing this poem, he was gently poking fun at the conventional romantic poems that were being written by other poets.

Next

Sonnet 130: Section I (Lines 1

sonnet 130 my mistress eyes

His love most certainly isn't as ill-created as he presents in Sonnet 130, but she is a regular woman. That edition, The Sonnets of Shakespeare, consists of 154 sonnets, all written in the form of three quatrains and a couplet that is now recognized as Shakespearean. Sonnet 130 'My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun' The sun is bright and warm; her eyes are cold and dull! That line in particular seems almost openly satirizing the tradition itself, as it is well known that many Elizabethan poets would compare their lovers to things that mortals could not achieve, leaving the realm of human to enter the pantheon of the gods. I have seen roses damasked, red and white, But no such roses see I in her cheeks; And in some perfumes is there more delight Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks. As he continues to write, he admits that he has never seen a goddess go, but his mistress walks on the ground. I used to feel conflicted having to do that in my literary classes: But with that said, I tend to go how it makes me feel and I feel like its a more of a statement on how narrow the idea of beauty was over a declaration of love which came in a distant second You have missed the important point of this sonnet , it is not about the early blooming of love in youthful passion but the lasting love and friendship that endears us to our chosen one.

Next

No Fear Shakespeare: Shakespeare’s Sonnets: Sonnet 130

sonnet 130 my mistress eyes

It is an odd use of metaphor, though. I have loved this sonnet for many years at least in part because of Sting! Hyperbole Hyperbole is a form of speech that exaggerates the facts in order to make a point. Scholars have attempted to illustrate the difference of tone between them by stating that the Fair Youth sequence refers to spiritual love, while the Dark Lady sequence refers to sexual passion. Was this sonnet, in fact, the first complaint against the fashion industry of poetry creating unrealistic images of women which simply could not be met by most women? She does not walk on air but on the ground, because she is a real woman, not a goddess. His mistress does not have eyes like the sun, coral lips, white skin, golden hair, rose cheeks or a nice breath as convention dictates. Where negative imagery about his mistress is introduced. I love to hear her speak, yet well I know That music hath a far more pleasing sound; I grant I never saw a goddess go; My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground: And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare As any she belied with false compare.


Next

Sonnet 130 free essay sample

sonnet 130 my mistress eyes

Usually, most Elizabethan love poetry was written in the tradition of the Petrarchan sonnet. Sonnet 130 is a pleasure to read for its simplicity and frankness of expression. A poet could praise a woman for having skin as white as snow. Similar to the airbrushed model pictures we see in magazines today, no real woman could live up to the unreachable standard of having perfectly red lips, pink cheeks, silky hair, fragrant breath, and more. We will dissect the sonnet, line by line, in an effort to understand the poem's true message.


Next

Poetic Devices Used in Shakespeare's Sonnet 130

sonnet 130 my mistress eyes

If snow is white, her skin is not — dun is another word for grey-brown; her hair is described as black wires, and she does not have a pleasant flush to her cheeks. It was lovely to look at, and it gave off a strong fragrance. Sonnet 130 mocks the typical Petrarchan metaphors by presenting a speaker who seems to take them at face value, and somewhat bemusedly, decides to tell the truth. It is indeed this blunt but charming sincerity that has made sonnet 130 one of the most famous in the sequence. We wouldn't really expect them to be, would we? He loves her for what the reality is, and not because he can compare her to beautiful things. This Stereotypical comparison is carried on through the metaphors in lines 3 and 4. Of the 154 sonnets that wrote throughout his lifetime, 126 were written to a figure known as the Fair Youth.

Next

Shakespeare Sonnet 130 Analysis: My mistress' eyes are nothing like (...)

sonnet 130 my mistress eyes

Ho visto rose variegate, rosse e bianche, ma tali rose non le vedo sulle sue guance; e in certi profumi c'e' maggiore delizia che nel fiato che la mia donna esala. In his poems and plays, Shakespeare invented thousands of words, often combining or contorting Latin, French, and native roots. Poets describe their mistresses' hair as gold wires, but my mistress has black wires growing on her head. It is quite a stretch to reach this conclusion, and it is not the popular interpretation of the poem, however an argument can be made that the poetic speaker spends an inordinate amount of time describing his mistress down to the bare bones. She holds a Bachelors Degree from Sarah Lawrence College and a Masters Degree in education from Mercy College.

Next

Sonnet 130 Form and Meter

sonnet 130 my mistress eyes

I love to hear her speak; yet I know perfectly well that music has a far more pleasant sound. Lines 7-8 And in some perfumes is there more delight Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks. So little record of his private life exists that most of what people know about Shakespeare stems from scholarly discussion and speculation, rather than actual records or facts. Despite conservative objections to the poem's glorification of sensuality, it was immensely popular and was reprinted six times during the nine years following its publication. This particular sonnet gives a really nice example of the turn. How we respond to these questions will probably come as much from our own convictions on these issues as it will from the poem itself.

Next

Sonnet 130

sonnet 130 my mistress eyes

Analyzing the Sonnet Sonnet 130 is starkly different in theme than Shakespeare's other sonnets. GradeSaver, 19 October 2005 Web. It is still unknown who many of the figures in his sonnets are, or whether or not Shakespeare authored his own works or merely signed his name on completed plays, and convincing arguments exist on both sides. Most sonnets, including others written by Shakespeare, praised women and practically deified them. Its message is simple: the dark lady's beauty cannot be compared to the beauty of a goddess or to that found in nature, for she is but a mortal human being.

Next